Tag Archives: advertising

39. The View from the Train

By Richard N. Anderson Excerpt from The Lost Chapters by Lisa Anderson, first published in 2013 A tall, tanned young man in his early thirties, carrying soft leather Abercrombie & Fitch weekender with a squash racquet sticking out, walked up … Continue reading

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36. After Work at the Original Irish Bar

Bill Taylor met Alan at Mullaley’s on First Avenue. Mullaley’s was one of those original Irish bars that managed to keep its anonymity.

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32. Lunch at the Racquet Club

New York’s Racquet and Tennis Club stood grandly, covering a full block on Park Avenue. Alan passed through the marble lobby with the ugly statue of the tennis player in the middle.

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31. Who Will Get the Account?

They entered the creative department through the enormous leather padded doorway. Alan smiled at the four typing secretaries arranged in a four-stall cubicle. Frederick Taylor, meet Herman Miller, he thought.

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19. The Deli

“I know a spot on Forty First and Lexington, part bar, part deli. I think they have air conditioning. Want to try it?” Alan ventured.

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15. Independence Day

By Lisa Anderson The metallic harmonics of the Electrolux followed her around the corner and into the bathroom. Claire Whitman shook her bangs to be able to see.

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13. One for the Resume

It took two weeks to select the winners. Finally it was over. The fridge at Ham Craig’s Editorial Service was left packed with beer and coca-cola from the committee’s late nights in the six story building on East 51st Street.

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12. The Catholic Committee

By Richard N. Anderson Alan began making a list of people he knew who would be good at judging TV ads. A gal who worked on the Procter business at Compton. A guy who had his own shop. A trombone … Continue reading

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10. The Interview

Alan opened the conference room door and put out his hand, all business. “Alan Robinson, call me Alan.”

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